Thursday, October 16, 2014

Caramelized onion herb cheese bread

 

Sounds good no? Let me tell you it tastes even better than it sounds. What’s not to like about Katie’s choice this month? Wait, maybe we could add some bacon? I didn’t, not this time but I think it’s a sound idea. But first, yes you heard it right, Katie is back with her choice for a filled semi-braid acting as Kitchen of the Month. A rather straight forward herb scented dough, part whole wheat, filled with caramelized onions and cheese… Lovely!

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I used King Arthur’s White Whole Wheat (a 2 kg bag travelled all the way from their hometown in Vermont to my hometown in the Netherlands) and regular bread flour. Baked the onions and then baked some more because while the onions were cooling and I was out of the house one of my cats thought sweet caramelized onions were the perfect afternoon snack… Came back to find a nice empty circle in the center of the pan!
Furthermore used fresh rosemary and mozzarella along with aged Gouda and almost forgot to brush the mustard (Dyon in my case) on the bottom. A bit of fiddling –scooting the onions aside and brush mustard on then the onions back on top) but it was there. Good thing it was because I have been a bit heavy handed with the sugar and the onions were almost too sweet. Next time I will definitely add some black pepper and cut back on the sugar.

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Onion, Herb, Cheese Stuffed Bread

Total time: 3 hours

Ingredients:

  • Dough:
  • 1/2 tsp (.07oz, 2gr) sugar
  • 1 1/2 tsp (.18oz, 5gr) dry yeast
  • 1/4 cup (2oz, 59ml) water
  • 1/8 cup (1oz, 29.5ml) milk
  • 1/8 cup (1oz, 29.5ml) olive oil
  • 1 egg
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1 cup (4.9oz, 140gr) whole wheat flour
  • 1 cup (5.4oz, 154gr) white flour, may not use all
  • 3/4 tsp (.15oz, 4.25) salt
  • 1 tsp (.05oz, 1.5gr) Herbes de Provence
  • Filling:
  • 1 tsp (.16oz, 4.5gr) butter
  • 2 tsp (.32oz, 9gr)olive oil
  • 2 medium red onions, chopped (1 3/4 cups, 7.6oz, 215gr)
  • 4 medium shallots chopped (3/4 cup, 3.3oz, 94gr)
  • 1 tsp (.14oz, 4gr) sugar
  • 15 fresh sage leaves, chopped (about 2 tbs - too light to weigh)
  • 1 tsp (.05oz, 1.5gr) rosemary
  • 1 tbs Dijon-style mustard (too difficult to weigh)
  • 1/2 cup (1.6oz, 45gr) Parmigiana Reggiano.
  • 1/2 cup (1.6oz, 45gr) Pecorino Romano (sheep's cheese)
  • 1 egg, beaten

Instructions:

  • Dough:
  • In large bowl, dissolve sugar in water.
  • Sprinkle in yeast; let stand for 10 minutes or until frothy.
  • Whisk in milk, eggs, egg yolks, oil, Herbes and salt.
  • Add the whole wheat flour and half of the white flour and stir to make soft dough.
  • Turn out onto lightly floured surface; knead for 10 minutes, adding enough of the remaining flour to make dough smooth and elastic.
  • Place in greased bowl, turning to grease all over. Cover with plastic wrap; let rise in warm draft-free place for 1 hour or until doubled in bulk.
  • Filling:
  • Meanwhile, in large skillet, heat butter with oil over medium heat.
  • Add onions, shallots, sugar  and cook until tender,
  • Reduce heat, add sage, rosemary and continue to cook until caramelized, stirring occasionally, about 20 minutes longer.
  • Let cool to room temperature.
  • To shape:
  • Grease baking sheet or line with parchment paper; punch down dough.
  • Turn out onto lightly floured surface.
  • Roll out into 12- x 11-inch (30 x 27 cm) rectangle.
  • Transfer to prepared pan.
  • Spread mustard lengthwise in 3-inch (8 cm) strip down center of rectangle.
  • Top with onion mixture.
  • Sprinkle with 3/4 of the cheese.
  • Using sharp knife and starting at 1 corner of dough, make diagonal cuts 1 inch (2.5 cm) apart almost to filling to form strips along 1 long side of dough. Repeat on other side, cutting diagonal strips in opposite direction.
  • Alternating strips from each side, fold strips over filling to resemble braid, overlapping ends by 1 inch (2.5 cm) and brushing with some of the egg to seal.
  • Cover with towel; let rise in warm place for 30 to 40 minutes or until doubled in bulk.
  • To bake:
  • Brush top with egg. Bake in center of 350°F (180°C) oven for 25 minutes or until puffed and golden.
  • Sprinkle remaining cheese down centre of braid; return to oven for 5 minutes.
  • Serve warm or let cool completely on rack. (Make-ahead: Wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate for up to 1 day; rewarm in oven before serving.).

 

Notes:
- Kneaded by hand, relaxing!
- Only used one egg in the dough and one egg for brushing. No reason, at the time I think that was what the recipe said. It didn’t
- Added about a 1/4 cup of biga to the dough, used about 1/8 cup of extra flour in kneading.
- Next time I will have to spread the filling out more over the middle, I don’t like the way there’s more dough on top than on the bottom. The strips were too wide I guess. Below is what I should have done…. Pictures from the past when I apparently knew what I was doing…
Old World Braided Coffe Cake weergegeven

- Ration filling to dough was just about right to eat a slice out of hand.
- Really nice to add some heat to it, add black pepper or maybe a chopped chili?
- Had to bake it longer than stated, approx. 35 minutes?

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Thanks Katie for stepping in this month and pick a wonderful loaf and a relaxing one at that! I really enjoyed baking this one, sometimes –more often these days- it is nice to bake something that smells so nice, looks so good and is not intimidating at all!

You can join the Bread Baking Buddies and earn your Buddy badge by simply baking your own version of this great braid by the end of October, sending a mail to Katie with your details and a picture (details at her blogpost) Please mention and link to the Bread Baking Babes in your post and ask for the Buddy badge! I am sure you will enjoy this one!
Do not forget to check the other Babes and see how their breads came out:

The Bread Baking Babes (current dozen) are:

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Bread Baking Babes in a Tuscany state of mind: Panmarino!

 

toscaans deeg

Panmarino, also known as Italian Rosemary Bread, is a fairly easy bread to make. It takes about 20 hours, but most of that time is spent on the overnight biga. So that sounds good in the summer, a tiny bit of work the evening before and some work the day after and hey presto… a wonderful aromatic bread on your table!

Cathy invited us to participate in her Bread Experiences for this month’s recipe and chose a Tuscan bread as Kitchen of the month. Tuscan why? (Well apart from the obvious reasons because well you know.. who can object to Tuscany?) But no this Babe participated in the workshop Plated Stories in beautiful Tuscany, and if that alone wasn’t already enough to make us all green with envy, Cathy of course also met with two other fabulous Babes: Jamie (Life’s a feast) and Ilva (Lucullian delights)! So, we, other Babes left in the not so green woods, ignored them for a bit and after sufficiently punishing them by not passing the wine bottle we decided to act normal again. Or.. what passes for normal in our little group. Knipogende emoticon

The recipe is from The Fundamental Techniques of Classic Bread Baking from The French Culinary Institute.The story of Panmarino as told by Carol is that this bread recipe comes from a place called Ferrara near Venice and is the invention of a baker named Luciano Pancalde.

Apparently years ago, Luciano was reading a biography of the d'Este family who once ruled Ferrara. He came across descriptions of the spectacular court banquets, which featured rosemary bread with a crust that "sparkled with diamonds". Of course, just like all good artisan bakers, Luciano experimented and baked until he came up with this wonderful aromatic, fresh rosemary fragrant, dome-shaped bread where you slash the top in the pattern of a star and sprinkle chunky crystals of sea salt into the crevices.

 

Now that I read this again, I realise I had this dome shaped bread, slashed a star pattern on top but totally forgot to add the “sparkling diamonds”! Ugh!

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Panmarino

Makes: 4 Loaves

Biga:

  • Bread flour 143 grams/5 ounces
  • Water 122 grams/4 1/4 ounces
  • Pinch of instant yeast

Final Dough:
  • Bread flour 884 grams/1 pound 15 ounces
  • Water 477 grams/1 pound 1 ounce
  • Milk 44 grams/1 1/2 ounces
  • Biga 265 grams/9 1/3 ounces
  • Salt 23 grams/3/4 ounce
  • Pinch of instant yeast
  • Olive oil 88 grams/3 ounces
  • Chopped fresh rosemary 9 grams/1/3 ounce

    Preparing the Biga:
    Combine the bread flour, water and yeast in a large mixing bowl. Stir with a wooden spoon until well blended.  Scape down the edge of the bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and let it rest at 75 degrees F. for 14 to 16 hours.

    Making the Final Dough:
    In the bowl of a stand mixer, combine the bread flour, water, milk, and biga. Using the dough hook, mix on low speed until blended.
    Add the salt and yeast and mix on low speed for 5 minutes.  Increase the speed to medium and mix for about 7 more minutes, or until the dough is smooth.  When the gluten is fully developed, mix in the olive oil and rosemary on low speed.

    Lightly oil a large bowl. Scrape the dough into the bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Let the dough ferment for 45 minutes.
    Remove the dough to a lightly-floured work surface and divide it into four 450-gram /16-ounce pieces. Shape the dough pieces into rounds. Cover with plastic wrap and let them bench rest for 15 minutes.
    Place two couches on a separate work surface or bread board and dust them with flour.

    toscaans 1Uncover the dough and, if necessary, lightly flour the work surface. Gently press on the dough to degas and carefully shape each piece into a tight and neat rounds.  Place one loaf on one side of the couche, fold the couche up to make a double layer of cloth to serve as a divider between the loaves, and place a second loaf next to the fold.  Repeat the process with the remaining two loaves and the second couche.  Cover with plastic wrap and proof for 1 hour.

    About an hour before you plan to bake the loaves, place a baking stone (or tiles) into the oven along with a steam pan (underneath) or iron skillet (on the top rack) and preheat the oven to 450 degrees F.
    Uncover the dough and score the top of each loaf in a star pattern using a lame or sharp knife. This particular formula doesn't say to do this, but you can sprinkle sea salt into the crevices as the original baker did to make it "sparkle with diamonds." (see there you go, that is what I subconsciously remembered and –thus- why I forgot LOL)

    Carefully transfer the loaves to the preheated baking stone using a peel or the back of a baking sheet. To make the steam, add 1 cup of ice to the iron skillet or steam pan.
    Bake for 40 minutes, or until the crust is light brown and crisp and the loaves make a hollow sound when tapped on the bottom.
    Remove the loaves from the oven and transfer to a wire rack to cool.

 foto 3

My notes:

- oh so easy! and fragrant!
- you don’t have to reduce the amount of dough… it makes four smallish loaves and freezes beautifully!
- I think I could have used more rosemary because the flavour wasn’t as distinct as I thought it would be.
- Mine were slow risers so prepare to take your time with the second proof
- I think mine could have had a bit more time still in the second proof, I found them surprisingly firm inside.
- or maybe a bit more liquid to get more defined holes in the bread. They were there but they could be more prominent

As I am writing this we are preparing for our holiday and I will set this post ready to post on the date. So I can’t direct you to Cathy’s page right now where you will find the details for the Buddies but I do think you Buddies, need to just add this bread to your repertoire. It’s a good one!

You can join the Bread Baking Buddies and earn your Buddy badge by simply baking this wonderful Tuscan bread by the end of July, sending a mail to Cathy with your details and a picture (details at her blogpost) Please mention and link to the Bread Baking Babes in your post.(ask for the Buddy badge!) I am sure you will enjoy this one!
Do not forget to check the other Babes and see how their breads came out:

The Bread Baking Babes (current dozen) are:

Monday, June 16, 2014

Bread Baking Babes heard it through the grapevine….

 

Now that we did it, I wonder why none of us had thought of adding wine to dough before…. Tanna showed us the way in her capacity as Kitchen of the Month. A travelling kitchen I might add with a “nomad bread baking library” (what are you packing dear? Oh just the essentials; my bread baking library…”) Grand I tell you!

Now this bread… really it got it all, it has the shape, it has the booze, it has spunk. Of course this time I saw fit to change the h** out of it. Not because I don’t like my wine, not because I am not a fan of spunk but the baking of this bread happened to collide with an order to bake bread for a “deluxe” BBQ. (Don’t ask me what the luxurious part was of this BBQ, I wasn’t invited, just asked to provide bread).

So yes, I added wine but mixed it with water and orange juice, and no I didn’t add any salami. I was tempted but I feared that salami didn’t appeal to the luxury part of the bbq party… so I left it out. I did however add bulghur, linseed and thyme

 

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Beaujolais Bread
Recipe By: A Passion for Bread: Lessons from a Master Baker
Yield: 16 rolls or a grape cluster

Ingredients:
454 grams white bread flour, unbleached, unbromated, 16 oz; 3.5 cups
7 grams fine sea salt, .24 oz; 1 1/8 teaspoons
5 grams instant dry yeast, .18 oz; 1.5 teaspoons
21  grams honey, .75 oz; 1 tablespoon
320 grams Beaujolais wine, 11.2 oz; 1 1/4 + 2 tablespoons
113 grams salami cut into 1/4 inch cube; room temp, 4 oz; 1 cup 

1. Scale all dry ingredients in a large bowl.
2. Add the honey to the dry ingredients and using your hands bring loosely together then form a well in the center.
3. The wine should be between 82° F and 84°.
4. Add the wine to the well in a slow steady stream as you rotate the bowl with one hand while simultaneously mixing the wine into the dry ingredients with your other hand.
Frequently scrape your fingers and the bowl to gather all ingredients into the dough ball. The bowl should be quite clean.
The dough will be soft, slightly wet and extremely sticky.
The dough should be just coming together. (taste to be sure salt was added)
Turn the dough out onto the counter.
The dough will be very sticky; do not give into the temptation to add more flour.

Kneading wet dough:
Hold hands, palms facing up, at opposite sides of the dough mass. Slide your fingers under the dough and lift the dough an inch or so from the surface. Squeeze your thumbs and index fingers together to form a tight OK sign through the dough.

While holding the OK sign, continue to curl thumbs and index fingers tightly together to pinch off a portion of dough. Working as quickly and smoothly as possible, moving the dough mass in approximately 1 to 1.5 inch increments, until the entire dough mass has been worked through. You should begin to feel the dough coming together.
“Remember, your hands are your memory-pay attention to the feel of the dough as it comes together.”

Turn dough a quarter turn and continue lifting, pinching and turning until it begins to take on an identifiable shape and becomes less and less sticky; taking anywhere from 5 to 15 minutes.  Resist the urge to add flour. A scraper is useful in collecting all the dough off the work area. Consider the dough kneaded when it forms into a ball. The dough should be soft, pliable and hold it’s shape; it should not be stiff and dry.

Form dough into ball: using both hands, lift front and fold over, quickly dropping it down to the counter. Repeat 4-5 times until a ball is formed. Use the scraper to ensure all the dough is gathered. Using the palms of your hands, flatten the dough ball into a rectangle. Scatter the salami evenly down the middle. Wrap the sides up and over salami, pinch dough together, turn and repeat until the salami is incorporated. Form into a ball.

Fermentation will take about one hour in a warm 75 to 80 degrees Fahrenheit draft free place.
Dust the counter lightly with flour. Place the dough onto floured counter. Pat into a thick square. Lift the two right corners and fold into the center patting the seam lightly. Lift the left two corners and fold into the center lightly patting the seam down. Repeat with the top two corners and the bottom two corners meeting in the middle patting down the seams.
Return the dough to the bowl seam side down, cover and return to a warm draft free place for about an hour. Repeat this process one more time. Total Time: three hours.

Cut the dough into 16 equal pieces with the bench scraper. (More or less… my dough liked to be in 18 equal pieces Knipogende emoticon)

Use parchment paper or a silicone liner in a baking sheet.
Roll 15 pieces into a small ball shape for rolls, the last piece will become the grapevine. Create a triangle by setting four balls together in a line followed by a line of three balls then two balls and finally one ball. Angle the remaining four balls to one side of the triangle so that the entire piece resembles a large cluster of grapes with the smaller one to the side.

With the last piece of dough roll it into a rope about 10 inches long and shape it into a curved grape vine shape that you attach to the top of the grape cluster. Dust with flour.

8. Final fermentation

Final fermentation may take from 60 to 90 minutes. If it over proofs but dough will be unusable. Set the timer so that you can record the time it takes for the final fermentation. Place the baking sheet in a warm 75 to 80°F draft free place. Final fermentation will take from 60 to 90 minutes.

Preheat the oven to 450°  with a baking stone about 30 minutes before you are ready to bake. An effective and cheap way to achieve a crisp crust is to cover the bread with a stainless steel bowl when it is first placed in the oven on the lowest oven rack.

Slide the baking sheet into the oven onto the pre-heated baking stone.

Here the directions call for using a stainless steel mixing bowl to cover the grape cluster in the oven. I don't have a bowl that big. I believe it's more likely you may have a  rectanglular

pan that would fit over the grape cluster. What ever you find to fit over it take for 10 minutes with the dough covered and then remove the bowl. Continue to bake until the bread is golden brown has a thick crust, total additional time 15 to 20 minutes. The total time then would be 25 to 30 minutes. The bread will be fully baked if it registers 185 two 210° F.

When fully baked transfer to cooling rack for at least one hour to cool.

My notes:

- there were quite a few Babes that commented on the rising (as in almost none) but that didn’t trouble me probably because I used far less wine in the dough

- the rolls looked great, smelled wonderful… the taste? Not a clue. The dear caterer is not one of great communication skills. Never got word on how the bread was received. I thought it looked grand! Really!!

Check out how the other Babes handled the dough:

The Bread Baking Babes (current dozen) are:

Would you like to be a Bread Baking Buddy? Just make the Beaujolais Breadand then send Tanna your link  (refer to the info in her announcement post). Submissions are due by June 29th.  Once you've posted, you'll receive a Buddy badge for baking along.

I hope you will join us!

Friday, May 30, 2014

The Roundup! Wild Rice and Onion Bread–> Bread Baking Babes May 2014

 

The month of May, my turn to host the Kitchen of the Month. For this recipe I looked up Peter Reinhart’s revised recipe of Wild Rice and Onion bread as it appears in “Artisan Breads Every Day”. My first loaf wasn’t that much of a success but my oh my… that second and third… (adding fried onions in the second and caramelized onions in the third) sure was a hit! Following are the Buddies who took the challenge and run with it. Enjoy!

 

 

Robin at a Shaggy Dough Story

 

 

Robin at A Shaggy Dough Story is a first time Buddy and a novice blogger dedicated to bake good bread and I am very proud to have her baking with us. Fabulous looking bread with a golden crust! Who needs more?

 

 

 

 

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Karen added Wild Rice and Onion to her Kitchen Stories. Turns out this bread was on her to-bake list for a long time, well… consider it done (and well done!) She used wild rice and flaked dried onions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is Paola, to be found over at Le Mie Recette con Esenza, a lovely golden crust and using kamut as part of the flours! She used brown rice instead of wild rice and caramelized onions in her version.

 

 

 

 

 

 

rice and onion bbb may 14

 

And here’s Carola blogging at Sweet and that’s it!. She is in the midst of an house overhaul… and still found time to bake and blog! Dedication I say!. She says: we had the floors redone, .. Unpack-clean-write blog - unpack-clean-write blog...

 

 

 

 

 

Claire (or rather Claartje Knipogende emoticon) sends us this beautiful bread from Scotland. Her experience wasn’t the best of yet but I think it certainly is a winner in looks. (and do click over to see that cute black lab!

 

 

brown rice bread closeup

 

Look at that!! Sunita added dried cherries to her version of this bread! (See… told you it was such a versatile dough!) She tells her story at My Foodlab, go on over!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Renee’s tale of this particular bread is all about diversion and shortcuts and turned out a gorgeous loaf… which I love!Take that recipe and go make it your own, so that’s what she did in her Kudo’s Kitchen.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now look at this one and the one above… how similar are they? These two are baked by Sandie and her post is to be found @ Crumbs of Love!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soepkipje turned out such gorgeous loaves without the added sugar and reducing the yeast (as we all did in this one haha, there is such thing as too much yeast in bread) and I would love to show you her picture but … either there is something wrong with me or with the picture itself but I have so much difficulty transferring a pic from Ipernity to here.. so sorry Rita, if you would like me to send the pic in a mail I will gladly add it here. Until then I’ll add the link to it: http://www.ipernity.com/doc/soepkipje/32759997

 

So… this is it for this month! I really enjoyed reading what you did with the recipe, love to see your diversions and omissions. And most of all looking at this diverse array of breads, small and large, in rolls and boules. Simply wonderful and I really would like to thank you all for participating this month and being a true Bread Baking Buddy!!

Thank you!

 

Karen

Friday, May 16, 2014

Bread Baking Babes showing their wild side: Wild Rice and Onion bread

 

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With me in charge of the Kitchen this month I decided to open Peter Reinhart’s “Artisan Breads Every Day”. The bread I chose to bake looks a lot like the Struan (the popular one from Brother Juniper’s Bakery) in a multiple-day or overnight version. This book has known and new recipes all revised and/or using the no-knead method made famous by Hertzberg and Francois and of course Jim Lahey.

I was quite smitten with the initial idea of Jim Lahey but each and every bread I made using his method I found lacking in flavour and gummy on the inside. I kept the Dutch pot/Romertopf idea because that is simply brilliant and delivers beautiful singing crust every time. I had almost the same problem with the Hertberg/Francois breads, my copy has been read a lot, but I never got satisfying results from it. Mind you; that is satisfying for what I look for in bread. And what I look for may very well not be what you are looking for in bread! (Disclaimer hehe). Probably just a difference in taste because I am Dutch? European? A very strange bread-eater? All of the above and maybe some more. So why try Peter Reinhart? Because at the time I thought I *needed* another bread book. And I thought maybe Uncle Peter had come up with a better method… To date I think I like his method best. Resulting breads do work. I am able to make a 100% ww loaf that actually rises and tastes good, not dry, not overly moist. I love the idea of being able to divide the steps overnight or 3 days.

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This might be an interesting on-the-side- read for anyone willing to try (or read about) the different methods and how they compare.
Lookie lookie here: our own Bread Baking Babe-ness Lynn has also made this bread! Two years ago. Also in May. Close enough right? And here it appears on the Fresh Loaf.

Wild Rice and Onion Bread
(Peter Reinhart: Artisan Breads Every Day)
After struan, wild rice and onion bread was the most popular bread at Brother Juniper’s Bakery, and a version of this recipe appears in my first book, Brother Juniper’s Bread Book. The recipe calls for wild rice, but it can also be made with brown rice or a combination of wild and brown rice, or any other cooked grain. At Brother Juniper’s, during the holiday season we even added parsley, sage, rosemary, thyme, garlic powder, and black pepper, which made for a wonderful bread for stuffing turkey. Note that it only takes about 1/4 cup of uncooked wild rice to make 1 cup (6 oz, by weight) of cooked wild rice; still, if you’re going to cook wild rice especially for this recipe, you might as well make a bigger batch and freeze 1-cup packets for future use—or have it with dinner!
This new version uses the overnight fermentation method. The yeast is added directly to the bowl, not rehydrated with the warm water and buttermilk. You can use either dried or fresh onions, and you can form the loaves into any size or shape. Dried onions are about one-tenth the weight of fresh onions and will absorb water from the dough, while fresh onions will leach moisture back into the dough. If you use dried onions, don’t rehydrate them before adding them to the dough, but do be aware that you may have to add an extra 2 to 4 tablespoons (1 to 2 oz) of water while mixing.
6 cups (27 oz / 765 g) unbleached bread flour
2 1/4 teaspoons (0.6 oz / 17 g) salt, or 3 1/2 teaspoons coarse kosher salt
2 tablespoons (0.66 oz / 19 g) instant yeast
1 cup (6 oz / 170 g) cooked wild rice or another cooked grain
1/4 cup (2 oz / 56.5 g) brown sugar
11/2 cups (12 oz / 340 g) lukewarm water (about 95°F or 35°C)
1/2 cup (4 oz / 113 g) lukewarm buttermilk or any other milk (about 95°F or 35°C)
1/4 cup (1 oz / 28.5 g) minced or chopped dried onions, or 2 cups (8 oz / 227 g) diced fresh onion (about 1 large onion)
1 egg white, for egg wash (optional)
1 tablespoon water, for egg wash (optional)

Do Ahead
Combine all of the ingredients, except the egg wash, in a mixing bowl. If using a mixer, use the paddle attachment and mix on the lowest speed for 1 minute. If mixing by hand, use a large spoon and stir for 1 minute. The dough should be sticky, coarse, and shaggy. Let the dough rest for 5 minutes.
Switch to the dough hook and mix on medium-low speed, or continue mixing by hand, for 4 minutes, adjusting with flour or water as needed to keep the dough ball together. The dough should be soft, supple, and slightly sticky.
Transfer the dough to a lightly floured work surface. Knead the dough for 2 to 3 minutes, adding more flour as needed to prevent sticking. The dough will still be soft and slightly sticky but will hold together to form a soft, supple ball. Place the dough in a clean, lightly oiled bowl, cover the bowl tightly with plastic wrap, and immediately refrigerate overnight or for up to 4 days. (If you plan to bake the dough in batches over different days, you can portion the dough and place it into two or more oiled bowls at this stage.)

On Baking Day
Remove the dough from the refrigerator about 2 hours before you plan to bake. Shape the dough into one or more sandwich loaves, using 28 ounces (794 g) of dough for 4 1/2 by 8-inch loaf pans and 36 ounces (1.02 kg) of dough for 5 by 9-inch pans; into freestanding loaves of any size, which you can shape as bâtards, baguettes, or boules; or into rolls, using 2 ounces (56.5 g) of dough per roll. When shaping, use only as much flour as necessary to keep the dough from sticking. For sandwich loaves, proof the dough in greased loaf pans. For freestanding loaves and rolls, line a sheet pan with parchment paper or a silicone mat and proof the dough on the pan.
Mist the top of the dough with spray oil and cover loosely with plastic wrap. Let the dough rise at room temperature for 1 1/2 to 2 hours, until increased to about 1 1/2 times its original size. In loaf pans, the dough should dome at least 1 inch above the rim. If you’d like to make the rolls more shiny, whisk the egg white and water together, brush the tops of the rolls with the egg wash just before they’re ready to bake.
About 15 minutes before baking, preheat the oven to 350°F (177°C), or 300°F (149°C) for a convection oven.
Bake the loaves for 10 to 15 minutes, then rotate the pan; rotate rolls after 8 minutes. The total baking time is 45 to 55 minutes for loaves, and only 20 to 25 minutes for rolls. The bread is done when it has a rich golden color, the loaf sounds hollow when thumped on the bottom, and the internal temperature is above 185°F (85°C) in the center.
Cool on a wire rack for at least 20 minutes for rolls or 1 hour for loaves before slicing.


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My Notes:

  • I like to add cheese (feta anyone?). And chives (or or…spinach? Tanna?). Not always. But it is a nice addition…
  • I have succesfully used yoghurt / or all milk instead of buttermilk and water for the liquid
  • I also subbed potato water for the water (oh and added some mashed potato as well… tsk tsk)
  • Hmm looks like I never can follow a recipe or leave good alone tsk tsk
  • Make sure any rice you use is properly done (soft-ish) because otherwise any bits on top of your bread will be pointy and dry. Not appealing.
  • Also… you can use any cooked grain. I’ve used whole grain bulghur, quinoa, amaranth….anything goes. I find that brown rice tends to disappear in the bread.
  • For the onions: I tried different things and I really liked the caramelized onions and the dried baked onions. Prefer them to fresh onions by far! Really, worth trying. (That has probably a lot to do with the smell of fresh onions in the dough after a night’s rest in the fridge. Brr. Don’t like that).

For this last version I decided to once again reduce the yeast and the sugar and make pointy rolls, I used baked dry onions, a smattering of olives and a mix of wild rice, brown rice and different grains. For the liquid I used all milk. This was the best one yet!

If you like to make only half the recipe, that’s what I did with the rolls:

385 gr flour (half whole wheat, half white)
1.1/8 tsp salt
1.1/2 tsp yeast
80 gr. uncooked rice combo (yep that is too much but once cooked I accidentally tipped the whole batch of rice in the dough…)
20 gr. sugar
250 gr milk
15 gr dried baked onions

Shaped 8 rolls, each 100 gram of dough. Baked with steam in the oven for about 25-30 minutes. No eggwash.

 

Bread Baking Buddy, be a Buddy and let us know all about it, by sending your details and results to me (as kitchen of the month this time). Send a mail with Buddy May 2014 in the subject line and please provide your name, blog url, post url and attach your favorite picture of the recipe. Send it to bakemyday (at) gmail (polkadot) com. Deadline is the 29th of this month. We want your breads!!
Round-up will be around the end of this month! (maybe a bit later as my twin boys celebrate their birthdays, by that time finished their final exams and will go on their first “vacation without parents but with friends”. Yikes. All in the course of those last days of this month.)

Also…. go ahead and check out my fellow Babes, see what they did to this bread and look at their mouthwatering pictures:

The Bread Baking Babes (current dozen) are:

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

April Bread Baking Babes: Pretzel Croissants

 

This month Heather over at girlichef is our host and she asked us to marry her. Or wait… she introduced her recipe and then asked if we wanted to marry her? I am not sure but it had something to do with pretzels, croissants, butter and marriage. Something. Not sure which was first.

Butter and croissants is always a good idea. Reading a recipe before you pick a day to bake is a good idea. No, make that reading your recipe thoroughly especially when you plan is a very good idea. Certainly when those recipes involve something with puff pastry and dough. (Cautionary advice; it wouldn’t hurt to read through anything regarding marriage before you embark either..)

Of course I didn’t read the recipe thoroughly. I skipread the recipe with a firm accent on the skip part of skipreading. I saw croissants… pretzels… yadayadaa…. –mumbling holy cow that’s a lot of butter this month- latidaaah sesame seeds, glaze…oh baked baking soda now that is interesting…teedeedeee.. loads of time left to bake…wheewheewhee … birthdays, last tests for school…let’s see..hmmm this week I can manage but not on tuesday.

And then I heard my fellow Babes over the three day approach…. and the two day approach…. and dough in the freezer to divide the hands on time…

My brain went in overdrive. (To be honest? It went fuzzy first.. that’s where I asked if I could use my puff pastry I had resting in the freezer. Of course not. Read the recipe!)

So. To make a long story short. No pretzels today. No croissants either. Nope not going to happen. Think I will make a Buddy this month.

me-made flower arrangement for Easter

However… please hop on over to my Bread Baking Babes to see how gorgeous and flakey their croissants turned out!

The Bread Baking Babes (current dozen) are:

Sunday, March 16, 2014

Bread Baking Babes make a splash; Floating Dough

This month we wrapped our dough in a teatowel, tied a pretty twine around it and called it a day!
please join us as a Bread Baking Buddy! Let Elle  know how you wrapped your dough by the end of this month....

Hehe, we did a little bit more than that but you guessed that already. Elle over at  Feeding My Enthusiasms        was our host this month and we gathered around her kitchen table while she spun us a story about how to wrap your dough and sink it off in a bucket of water....

The dough was a very rich dough, quite the amount of butter, sugar and eggs added to get a brioche like dough. Don't let it scare you, the dough was amazingly well-behaved, easy to handle and tame!
So far so good, nothing new there. But here we go.... now  we were supposed to wrap the dough in a floured tea towel, tie it up en sink it in a large bowl filled with warm water! Yes. Immerse a package of dough in hot water.

And then? Well, it sinks to the bottom.

Then within 30-45 minutes it rises back to the surface (any submarine songs?)
The packet bobs right up and floats on the water... so funny! It's all bulky and feels airy.
Suspense.....

Because it's still wrapped in that teatowel! Granted, I floured it heavily but then again, the whole thing is soaking wet so what the dough looks like? I was really wondering if I could get it out more or less in one piece.

Turns out I need not worry. The dense layer of flour kept the dough ball intact and protected from the water and with the help of my dough scraper I could get the dough out pretty easily.

Again on the work surface and pushed back, balled up and put to rise in a loaf pan. I didn't make two separate loaves but instead chose a bigger loaf pan and put two balls of dough next to each other to rise.
And then made dinner, all of us around the table (doesn't happen very often these days), enjoyed after dinner coffee..... forgot ALL about that dough rising@

Unfortunately -in this case :-() it rose pretty quickly although I used only 1.1/4 tsp of yeast. Over rise! So so very unnecessary. I baked it and we had it the next mroning for breakfast. A real brioche like dough, dries out quite fast but overall very very nice loaf of bread!

Thanks Pat for this step out of our comfortzone again in a direction I never imagined!







It was fun and I was almost sorry the boys have grown so much because this must be so great to do with children around! Sinking and rising dough packages! Can it get any better? And see -> no ruined tea towel!
But now, can someone please tell me WHY we do this?
I mean, does it help the dough in any way? Make it softer? Or quicker? More controlled rise?
Anyone?

This is what Elle discovered:
The theory is that the dough, being delicate, will benefit from rising in water where the water barrier will keep the yeast produced gases inside the dough, for a better first rise. Having it wrapped in a tea towel is probably necessary since Beard says this is a sticky dough, even when the first kneading is done.

Also please let Elle know you baked along with us: YOU are invited to play along, get watery, and become a Bread Baking Babe Buddy. Just bake the bread (recipe below), take a photo, send her an e-mail (to elle dot lachman at gmail dot com) with the photo and a link to your post, plus a few words on your experience baking this bread. Variations are encouraged, but do try the water proofing, OK? By the way, this makes excellent French Toast

!